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Nuremberg Kultur (Shortcut: 0)
Information about the Former Nazi Party Rally Grounds
1. Stations 2. Gallery

7. Zeppelin Grandstand

Zeppelin Grandstand, around 1938

Zeppelin Grandstand, around 1938 (Stadtarchiv Nuremberg).

The Pergamon Altar from Asia Minor

The Pergamon Altar from Asia Minor (Pergamonmuseum, Berlin).

From 1933, the National Socialists used the area for their Party Rallies. The Zeppelin Field – named after the landing of one of Count Zeppelin‘s airships in 1909 – was the central venue for staging the Party Rallies. The architect, Albert Speer, chose the ancient Pergamon Altar as a model for the grandstand. The building, erected in 1935–1937, was made of concrete and brickwork, faced with shell lime slabs. The original complex was considered a representative example of National Socialist state architecture.

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Blowing up of the swastika on the Zeppelin Grandstand, 22 April, 1945

Blowing up of the swastika on the Zeppelin Grandstand, 22 April, 1945 (Deutsche Wochenschau GmbH).

Blowing up of the gallery of pillars of the Zeppelin Grandstand, June 1967

Blowing up of the gallery of pillars of the Zeppelin Grandstand, June 1967 (Nürnberger Nachrichten).

During World War II, the complex remained largely intact. On 22 April, 1945, the US Army held its victory parade at the main grandstand. After the ceremony, the swastika was blown up, to make the entire world aware of the end of National Socialism. In 1967, the City of Nuremberg had the pillar galleries demolished because they were unsafe. Some years later, the side towers were also taken down to half their previous height. Today the relics of the NS buildings are used as spectators‘ stands.

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